2018 winners

 

The Tapestry Design Prize for Architects 2018 attracted a record number of 142 design submissions from 98 national and international entrants. The judging panel selected 15 finalists. 

First prize was awarded to Pop Architecture and Hotham Street Ladies. Emeritus Professor Kay Lawrence AM, TDPA 2018 Judging Panel Chair remarked that "their tapestry design Chaos and Fertility, rejects the absence of ornament in Boullée's practice as well as his ideals of enlightenment and 'male reason'. Their design playfully responds to Walsh's brief through their subversion of the western canon, with a focus on transgressive textiles, female history and subjectivity."

Second prize was awarded to Arturo Muela, Paola Ibarra + Daniela Gutiérrez for Colliding Universes in Saint Peter’s Four Meter Woollen Eye and Third Prize to Kevin Liu for After Turrell, Backside of the Moon.

The winning design and prize recipients were selected on the basis of artistic merit; ability to engage to a high degree with the unique qualities of tapestry; ability to design a major artwork that responds to a contemporary architectural space; and capacity to celebrate tapestry in architecture, through understanding of materials form, design and collaborative interpretation. 

Voting for People's Choice Award opens 16 August and closes 26 October

 
Pop Architecture.jpg

AWARDED FIRST PRIZE

Pop Architecture + Hotham Street Ladies
Chaos and Fertility

Deep within the submerged, rocky base of Newton’s Cenotaph, and obscured in the shadowy nether regions of the subterranean colonnade, the secret sect of Diana of Ephesus continued at their needle work.

There was no place for them or their practice in Boullee’s cult architecture, its principles promoting the total absence of ornament and other. Cast aside, they railed against Etienne-Louis Boullee’s sphere as an absolute and perfect symbol of Male Reason.

Instead, they conceived of a work that would blow apart this male fantasy: a resplendent, vivid and richly textured tapestry, which - when joined at the seams - would shroud the geometric purity of the sphere with a riotously decorative display. It would be a depiction of the hidden grottos at which they worshipped, each containing a female deity.

When revealed, this would envelop Newton’s Cenotaph with potent symbols of female fertility and fecundity.

 
TPDA-Entry Proposal-ST.PETER EYES.jpg

AWARDED SECOND PRIZE

Arturo Muela, Paola Ibarra + Daniela Gutiérrez
Colliding Universes in Saint Peter's Four Meter Woollen Eye

This piece represents Étienne-Louis Boullée´s vision and megalomania. This enlarged geometric eye is an illustration of his desire for grandeur and power through design that would seem too complex or nearly impossible to put together, or in this case, be woven.

As Boullée´s Cenotaph for Isaac Newton, this eye is an ode to remembrance and delimitations. The different interpretations that can result from this piece allude as well to light - a notable characteristic in Boullée´s tribute to Newton -, and movement - distinctive in Jean Tinguely´s Kinetic Art -.

Colliding Universes: What could be considered just an eye, could also be seen as a thin line between past and present, or the separation of interior and exterior. Likewise, this eye could be considered as a vehicle for parallel universes to collide in the viewers’ minds, flourishing as new interpretations: a womb, an ocean, space, or an eclipse. This timeless design can also remind us of our past or tap into our future.

Saint Peter’s Eye: Aiming to recreate Saint Peter´s eye is as impossible as Boullée´s designs for his time. The displayed image of an  iris is provisional. In case of being selected as the winning design, an iris from a member of Mona´s community will be photographed to be interpreted in tapestry technique. The chosen member will be someone who represents leadership, as Saint Peter did in his time.

Four Metre: The eye is a geometric figure fuelled by cultural meanings that have turned it into a metaphysical object. Inspired by Boullée, we intend to amplify the eye by enlarging it 173 times its original size of 2.3 cm coinciding with the upper arch´s diameter in the hypothetical site. Therefore, scale becomes a megalomaniac stimulant that empowers our visions. 

Woollen Eye: The selection of an eye for this piece is the shared complexity between a human iris made out of millions of threads and the fifteenth-century tapestry technique undertaken by the Australian Tapestry Workshop (ATW).

 
 

AWARDED THIRD PRIZE

Kevin Liu
After Turrell, Backside of the Moon

This design reinterprets one of Turrell's recurring works, Backside of the Moon, in the Space Division Constructions series and describes a tapestry of considerable thickness, with a velvet-like pile weave in deep blacks mixed in with rich dark colours. The purpose is to capture and reflect as little light as possible and to present a neutral backdrop to the Pharos Wing that recalls the darkness and intensity of Turrells dark-room works.

Within the centre of the tapestry is a rectangle of irregularly woven dark coloured thread of varying shades and thicknesses, only just slightly visible from the surface of the tapestry. Upon closer inspection this rectangle recedes into the textural quality of the tapestry, and at a distance, as a whole, it suggests the outline of a rectangle that references the barely perceptible apertures in the Space Division Constructions. Similarly, two arcs adorn the sides of the tapestry to mimic the faint wall lighting that is typical to these works.

The gradient and textural variation within the design is taken from a series of mezzotint experiments on copper based on the acclimatising experience to lighting levels in Turrell's Backside of the Moon, in which the outline of the aperture is gently coaxed through burnishing of the deep wells and burrs of a mezzotint ground. Striations within the image emerge due to inconsistencies of the rocker, exhaustion as well as the average of heavy 30-50 directional passes on the copper plate. The deep wells and burrs of the plate impart themselves to the cotton rag paper when printed under heavy pressure, producing a deep, rich velvet print with a density and texture unlike any other. The final printed state of this incomplete mezzotint work would form the basis of this design.

 

 


2018 finalists

 

 3RDRM  Architectural Fragments in the Shadow of Boullée   The tapestry designs are simple fragments to a larger picture, to a larger aspect – they represent a fragment of our perception of the object, perceived through light falling on surface, shadow representing depth & movement and changing colour, the patina of materiality.  The tapestry designs are considered arranged either as a triptych or as an individual element; the representation of architectural references through the iconic, the modernist and the new contemporary falling within the round grey ‘shadow of Boullée’.  At what point does the perception of the object no longer become recognizable? What minimal extraction of the object can still maintain its purity, its restrained geometry and its fundamental characteristics?  The designs explore these micro observations of the object, fragments represented and connected through darkness, through light and patina– extracts of an architectural masterpiece stripped back to a single fragment.  The darkness in black: the modernist restrained geometry of Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, Germany 1968; its purity of the line and precision, its absorption of light and its dark materiality.  The play of light on white: the iconic Le Corbusier model unequivocally represented by Villa Savoye, Poissey, France 1931; the play and movement of light on surfaces casting shadow, reflection and movement.  The changing patina: the new contemporary reference through RCR Architectes’ Musee Soulages in Rodez, France 2014; landscape and architecture in unity, the solid, the void and evolution of surface and materiality.  These three fragments are precisely that, fragments; perhaps recogniable or merely a ‘pixel’ of our perception of the greater picture.

3RDRM
Architectural Fragments in the Shadow of Boullée

The tapestry designs are simple fragments to a larger picture, to a larger aspect – they represent a fragment of our perception of the object, perceived through light falling on surface, shadow representing depth & movement and changing colour, the patina of materiality.

The tapestry designs are considered arranged either as a triptych or as an individual element; the representation of architectural references through the iconic, the modernist and the new contemporary falling within the round grey ‘shadow of Boullée’.

At what point does the perception of the object no longer become recognizable? What minimal extraction of the object can still maintain its purity, its restrained geometry and its fundamental characteristics?

The designs explore these micro observations of the object, fragments represented and connected through darkness, through light and patina– extracts of an architectural masterpiece stripped back to a single fragment.

The darkness in black: the modernist restrained geometry of Mies van der Rohe’s Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin, Germany 1968; its purity of the line and precision, its absorption of light and its dark materiality.

The play of light on white: the iconic Le Corbusier model unequivocally represented by Villa Savoye, Poissey, France 1931; the play and movement of light on surfaces casting shadow, reflection and movement.

The changing patina: the new contemporary reference through RCR Architectes’ Musee Soulages in Rodez, France 2014; landscape and architecture in unity, the solid, the void and evolution of surface and materiality.

These three fragments are precisely that, fragments; perhaps recogniable or merely a ‘pixel’ of our perception of the greater picture.

 
    Conrad Gargett  'Memento Mori.' Remember You Must Die.      
  
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
  
  
  
  
    The imagined location for the installation is the internal face of the dome in Boullée’s proposed Cenotaph for Newton.  Our proposal draws inspiration from the ceilings of the Islamic religious houses of worship that are built to sense the divine. This architectural tradition avoids the use of figurative images to create an experience of sheer unbelievable richness, precision and detail, using geometric patterns. Gazing up into a kaleidoscopic world of these ceilings invokes a feeling of transcendental glory.  Using a contemporary approach, we were inspired by MONA’s fascination with light and death and this is investigated within the mega-pattern. This continues the central theme of the Pharos works - the transient quality of light. This strategy pays tribute to David Walsh’s ambition to insure that his ‘last gasp will also be his last laugh’.  ‘Skulls en masse’ are organised as a motif forming a series of complex geometries that create a patterned lattice extending over the entire internal surface of the Cenotaph’s dome. The non-figurative pattern making of the architectural tradition is supercharged by the latent symbolism of the skull – a signifier of death and permanence.  The collage uses imagery of a nebula as its background, and resonates with the Pharos’s fascination of the ephemeral nature of light. This scene will be punctuated by the small sun lit holes used to create Boullée’s ‘Night Effect’ on the dome; an illusion of stars in the night sky. At night when Boulleée’s ‘Day Effect’ is in operation, the mysterious glow created by an armillary sphere hanging in the centre will reveal the kaleidoscope worlds above.  This tapestry for the Pharos Wing is a smaller segment of the overall design for the dome, a glimpse of what might have been

 

Conrad Gargett
'Memento Mori.' Remember You Must Die. 

The imagined location for the installation is the internal face of the dome in Boullée’s proposed Cenotaph for Newton.

Our proposal draws inspiration from the ceilings of the Islamic religious houses of worship that are built to sense the divine. This architectural tradition avoids the use of figurative images to create an experience of sheer unbelievable richness, precision and detail, using geometric patterns. Gazing up into a kaleidoscopic world of these ceilings invokes a feeling of transcendental glory.

Using a contemporary approach, we were inspired by MONA’s fascination with light and death and this is investigated within the mega-pattern. This continues the central theme of the Pharos works - the transient quality of light. This strategy pays tribute to David Walsh’s ambition to insure that his ‘last gasp will also be his last laugh’.

‘Skulls en masse’ are organised as a motif forming a series of complex geometries that create a patterned lattice extending over the entire internal surface of the Cenotaph’s dome. The non-figurative pattern making of the architectural tradition is supercharged by the latent symbolism of the skull – a signifier of death and permanence.

The collage uses imagery of a nebula as its background, and resonates with the Pharos’s fascination of the ephemeral nature of light. This scene will be punctuated by the small sun lit holes used to create Boullée’s ‘Night Effect’ on the dome; an illusion of stars in the night sky. At night when Boulleée’s ‘Day Effect’ is in operation, the mysterious glow created by an armillary sphere hanging in the centre will reveal the kaleidoscope worlds above.

This tapestry for the Pharos Wing is a smaller segment of the overall design for the dome, a glimpse of what might have been

 
 Kenneth Wong  Naked Wonder        The mineral ochre walls describe a cross-section through time as much as the everyday and ceremonial life in Aboriginal culture. This image is presented as an interplay between the scale of the ochre walls and the resolution of the image; an abstracted photograph, taken on the banks of a creek in the West MacDonnell Ranges one late afternoon. The form, scale and texture of this landscape feature have been reimagined here as a piece of tapestry, capturing the drama of its setting and the naked wonder of earthly colours telling the threads of time. In and of itself, the ochre pits are architectonic - an exposed and consequently expressive landscape created from mining by generations of Aboriginal people.  The proposal for this tapestry design uses the loom as a device to weave together narratives told from the many parts that have been delicately notched out of this natural feature by ritual and incorporated as an important part of Aboriginal culture. The silken texture of ochre hues and glimmer from sunlight tracking across the exposed Mica and Heavitree Quartzite have been reset within the proportions of the framed image, and the scale of the ochre wall ultimately made ambiguous in its new material outcome. The tapestry becomes a portal-like, transitionary experience as one moves back and forth between scene and weave.  The design explores how material connects beings and things. On one hand the weft and warp of individual and collective memories are symbolic in the reconstruction of the image. On the other, the tapestry invites one to consider what evokes memories, what grounds a relationship between object and people, and what reinforces a sense of time and place.  The artwork is presented as an organic element geometrically framed in circular form, taking shape in place with the other foyer exhibits.

Kenneth Wong
Naked Wonder

 The mineral ochre walls describe a cross-section through time as much as the everyday and ceremonial life in Aboriginal culture. This image is presented as an interplay between the scale of the ochre walls and the resolution of the image; an abstracted photograph, taken on the banks of a creek in the West MacDonnell Ranges one late afternoon. The form, scale and texture of this landscape feature have been reimagined here as a piece of tapestry, capturing the drama of its setting and the naked wonder of earthly colours telling the threads of time. In and of itself, the ochre pits are architectonic - an exposed and consequently expressive landscape created from mining by generations of Aboriginal people.

The proposal for this tapestry design uses the loom as a device to weave together narratives told from the many parts that have been delicately notched out of this natural feature by ritual and incorporated as an important part of Aboriginal culture. The silken texture of ochre hues and glimmer from sunlight tracking across the exposed Mica and Heavitree Quartzite have been reset within the proportions of the framed image, and the scale of the ochre wall ultimately made ambiguous in its new material outcome. The tapestry becomes a portal-like, transitionary experience as one moves back and forth between scene and weave.

The design explores how material connects beings and things. On one hand the weft and warp of individual and collective memories are symbolic in the reconstruction of the image. On the other, the tapestry invites one to consider what evokes memories, what grounds a relationship between object and people, and what reinforces a sense of time and place.

The artwork is presented as an organic element geometrically framed in circular form, taking shape in place with the other foyer exhibits.

          Aaron Fein  Polaris     
  
  
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
  
  
  
  
  
    Combining Boullée’s design spirit with the curatorial inclinations of MONA’s Pharos wing, my proposal for the 2018 Tapestry Design Prize for Architects utilizes the medium of light to transport viewers into an abstract and unconstructable architectural environment.  As an architect working exclusively in textiles, I have, over a number of years, developed and applied digital/machine embroidery techniques to dynamic spatial effect. Through the precise directional stitching of high sheen threads, I subtly manipulate stitch angles to reflect light at different intensities, so that the play of light over surface continuously changes relative to a viewer’s motion.  The geometric structure of my proposed design is a mosaic of tessellated triangles, each rendered in one of six colors, and hatched at one of three different angles (0°, 45°, or 135°). While the colors highlight and organize a graphic pattern of vertical bands that reinforce the flatness of the picture plane; the light-reflective hatching creates the illusion of an isometric topology that subtly transforms as one moves in relation to the piece. Subsequently it is up to the viewer, who is placed squarely at the nexus between these two conflicting modes, to try to reconcile the tension between the work’s two and three-dimensionality.  If fibers that reflect, rather than absorb light, could be woven at oblique angles, I am confident that the effects of my design could be translated into the medium of tapestry. If so, and the committee selects my work, I envision a mutually beneficial collaboration that would advance both the vocabulary of architecture tapestry as well as my own work using fiber to communicate architectural experience.   note:     The 2:1 proportion of the design is intended to measure 7m wide by 3.5m high (dimensions are variable and could be redesigned to accommodate different proportions or overall dimensions).

 

 

 

Aaron Fein
Polaris

Combining Boullée’s design spirit with the curatorial inclinations of MONA’s Pharos wing, my proposal for the 2018 Tapestry Design Prize for Architects utilizes the medium of light to transport viewers into an abstract and unconstructable architectural environment.

As an architect working exclusively in textiles, I have, over a number of years, developed and applied digital/machine embroidery techniques to dynamic spatial effect. Through the precise directional stitching of high sheen threads, I subtly manipulate stitch angles to reflect light at different intensities, so that the play of light over surface continuously changes relative to a viewer’s motion.

The geometric structure of my proposed design is a mosaic of tessellated triangles, each rendered in one of six colors, and hatched at one of three different angles (0°, 45°, or 135°). While the colors highlight and organize a graphic pattern of vertical bands that reinforce the flatness of the picture plane; the light-reflective hatching creates the illusion of an isometric topology that subtly transforms as one moves in relation to the piece. Subsequently it is up to the viewer, who is placed squarely at the nexus between these two conflicting modes, to try to reconcile the tension between the work’s two and three-dimensionality.

If fibers that reflect, rather than absorb light, could be woven at oblique angles, I am confident that the effects of my design could be translated into the medium of tapestry. If so, and the committee selects my work, I envision a mutually beneficial collaboration that would advance both the vocabulary of architecture tapestry as well as my own work using fiber to communicate architectural experience.

note:

The 2:1 proportion of the design is intended to measure 7m wide by 3.5m high (dimensions are variable and could be redesigned to accommodate different proportions or overall dimensions).

 
 Grimshaw  Looking into the Face of God     "A scientific mind has no time for the bullshit of organized religion. On the other hand, astronomers look into the face of God every night they look into the universe." -   James Turrell, in a discussion with Elizabeth Pearce, MONA    Science and art don’t want to do the same thing. Science is about progress whereas art wants to hold up a mirror of what we are currently doing, as a kind of moral measure. But both science and art are united in their ability to alter our perception of the world. Both deal with reality as a work of construction.  Our proposal follows the established theme in the Pharos wing of revealing the construction behind our experience of reality as something that is enabled by grand shifts of perception. We have responded to the massive platonic geometry, the implied gravitational pull and the control of light of Boullée’s Cenotaph for Newton (and its formal influence on the shape of the Pharos wing at MONA), and The Perceptual Cell by Turrell – a large spherical orb with its uncertainly human interior - located adjacent to the site for the tapestry.  Our composition visualizes a gravitational wave emanating from The Perceptual Cell, bending and reshaping experience (or as Einstein would say, Spacetime). However, we want our gravitational wave tapestry to have questionable properties and multiple interpretations, and not just be another singular representation of neutron stars colliding, or merely a dramatic rendition of vivid hallucinations possibly occurring inside The Perceptual Cell.  We hope viewers of the tapestry wonder whether the image is mathematically (digitally) generated or artistically aestheticized. We hope people feel a little disorientation regarding the perspective – that the geometry is inversible, expandable and compressable. We hope it is seen as an architectural gateway in a wall to another dimension and also that it is not seen as a separate dimension at all but that the wall is quivering as the dimension that the viewers are in, undergoes change. We wish for people to feel excited by the close observation of warm hands crafting a woolen picture of a massive quantum mechanical mystery.

Grimshaw
Looking into the Face of God

"A scientific mind has no time for the bullshit of organized religion. On the other hand, astronomers look into the face of God every night they look into the universe." - James Turrell, in a discussion with Elizabeth Pearce, MONA

Science and art don’t want to do the same thing. Science is about progress whereas art wants to hold up a mirror of what we are currently doing, as a kind of moral measure. But both science and art are united in their ability to alter our perception of the world. Both deal with reality as a work of construction.

Our proposal follows the established theme in the Pharos wing of revealing the construction behind our experience of reality as something that is enabled by grand shifts of perception. We have responded to the massive platonic geometry, the implied gravitational pull and the control of light of Boullée’s Cenotaph for Newton (and its formal influence on the shape of the Pharos wing at MONA), and The Perceptual Cell by Turrell – a large spherical orb with its uncertainly human interior - located adjacent to the site for the tapestry.

Our composition visualizes a gravitational wave emanating from The Perceptual Cell, bending and reshaping experience (or as Einstein would say, Spacetime). However, we want our gravitational wave tapestry to have questionable properties and multiple interpretations, and not just be another singular representation of neutron stars colliding, or merely a dramatic rendition of vivid hallucinations possibly occurring inside The Perceptual Cell.

We hope viewers of the tapestry wonder whether the image is mathematically (digitally) generated or artistically aestheticized. We hope people feel a little disorientation regarding the perspective – that the geometry is inversible, expandable and compressable. We hope it is seen as an architectural gateway in a wall to another dimension and also that it is not seen as a separate dimension at all but that the wall is quivering as the dimension that the viewers are in, undergoes change. We wish for people to feel excited by the close observation of warm hands crafting a woolen picture of a massive quantum mechanical mystery.

 
 Nicholas Miller  Warped Fragments of an Ethereal Nature         “There is pleasure in the pathless woods,    There is rapture on the lonely shore,    There is society, where none intrudes,    By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:    I love not man the less, but Nature more.”   - Lord Byron  Natural spaces are finite, and our experiences within these spaces are becoming more constructed and curated as time evolves. This tapestry explores the juxtaposition between natural and architectural sites in the modern context.  The tapestry, seemingly incomplete, is exhibited in front of a mirror of a similar scale. The ‘completed’ top third of the tapestry depicts, through both warp and weft, Cradle Mountain, a significant and awe-inspiring site in Tasmania. As it draws closer to the bottom of the composition, and the gallery floor, the clear image depicted at the top of the tapestry starts to dissipate, leaving the warp exposed. The weft becomes non-existent, exposing the reflective surface beyond, and thus the viewer and the significant architectural site, start to merge with the soft sky of the tapestry. The merging of natural and architectural space is significant, the untamed landscape is a stark contrast to the museum site, a place traditionally heralded as a place of elevated social significance.  The hard surfaces of the exhibition space reverberate and chatter as furniture moves and plates are served. The natural environment depicted in the tapestry is silent, soft and still. As the viewer approaches, they consider the fibre of the tapestry, and of the natural environment, the warp leading their eye upward to the sublime scene above. The mountains however, are an inverted, and the viewers’ perspective is warped. The positive space suspended above defies plausibility, and the fragmented void that is the sky below fractures and fades into a mesmerising blur of fibre and architecture, altered and incoherent.

Nicholas Miller
Warped Fragments of an Ethereal Nature 

“There is pleasure in the pathless woods,

There is rapture on the lonely shore,

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:

I love not man the less, but Nature more.”

- Lord Byron

Natural spaces are finite, and our experiences within these spaces are becoming more constructed and curated as time evolves. This tapestry explores the juxtaposition between natural and architectural sites in the modern context.

The tapestry, seemingly incomplete, is exhibited in front of a mirror of a similar scale. The ‘completed’ top third of the tapestry depicts, through both warp and weft, Cradle Mountain, a significant and awe-inspiring site in Tasmania. As it draws closer to the bottom of the composition, and the gallery floor, the clear image depicted at the top of the tapestry starts to dissipate, leaving the warp exposed. The weft becomes non-existent, exposing the reflective surface beyond, and thus the viewer and the significant architectural site, start to merge with the soft sky of the tapestry. The merging of natural and architectural space is significant, the untamed landscape is a stark contrast to the museum site, a place traditionally heralded as a place of elevated social significance.

The hard surfaces of the exhibition space reverberate and chatter as furniture moves and plates are served. The natural environment depicted in the tapestry is silent, soft and still. As the viewer approaches, they consider the fibre of the tapestry, and of the natural environment, the warp leading their eye upward to the sublime scene above. The mountains however, are an inverted, and the viewers’ perspective is warped. The positive space suspended above defies plausibility, and the fragmented void that is the sky below fractures and fades into a mesmerising blur of fibre and architecture, altered and incoherent.

 
 Qing Ye  Nature   MONA is a seductive, visceral, subterranean PANDORA’s box like space. From ephemeral works by James Turrell to that of extreme weight and elaborate intricacy by Richard Wilson and Jean Tinguely, there is a sense of mystery, myth, delight, but also perhaps of trepidation.  PHAROS  was the world’s greatest lighthouse. Lighthouses are used to alert, often to warn.  BOULLÉE’S CENOTAPH  was meant to house the dead body of a Christian man of science who dedicated his entire life to the investigation of the physical universe. It also reversed night and day.  There is something profound, unsettling, and resolutely dichotomous and uncertain in all the above. Perhaps it would be fitting to confront the elephant (or perhaps the Minotaur) in the room,  NATURE , itself.  Finally after squeezing through MONA’s many subterranean crevices, a germinating spore has taken hold on one of the gallery walls and threatens to take over.  NATURE  has finally been able to infiltrate this gridded geometric bastion of 21st century human cultural endeavor, forcing visitors to come to reckon with the very origin of life.  The proposal abstracts an image of ancient Tasmanian rainforests. A prehistoric fern in the center is woven in highly detailed three-dimensional volume, further out the work transitions to become an abstracted woven texture, and at its edges the weave becomes more and more sparse to allow both light and people to pass through, as well as give full expression to the underlying filigree of warps and wefts that underpin tapestry. The proposal seeks to be both figurative as the earliest tapestries were, and textural as the works of more recent fiber artists. Most of all it seeks to stand apart from the existing abstract and perceptual installations and provide a more direct reference through tapestry’s quality of incorporating the figurative and haptic together.

Qing Ye
Nature

MONA is a seductive, visceral, subterranean PANDORA’s box like space. From ephemeral works by James Turrell to that of extreme weight and elaborate intricacy by Richard Wilson and Jean Tinguely, there is a sense of mystery, myth, delight, but also perhaps of trepidation. PHAROS was the world’s greatest lighthouse. Lighthouses are used to alert, often to warn. BOULLÉE’S CENOTAPH was meant to house the dead body of a Christian man of science who dedicated his entire life to the investigation of the physical universe. It also reversed night and day.

There is something profound, unsettling, and resolutely dichotomous and uncertain in all the above. Perhaps it would be fitting to confront the elephant (or perhaps the Minotaur) in the room, NATURE, itself.

Finally after squeezing through MONA’s many subterranean crevices, a germinating spore has taken hold on one of the gallery walls and threatens to take over. NATURE has finally been able to infiltrate this gridded geometric bastion of 21st century human cultural endeavor, forcing visitors to come to reckon with the very origin of life.

The proposal abstracts an image of ancient Tasmanian rainforests. A prehistoric fern in the center is woven in highly detailed three-dimensional volume, further out the work transitions to become an abstracted woven texture, and at its edges the weave becomes more and more sparse to allow both light and people to pass through, as well as give full expression to the underlying filigree of warps and wefts that underpin tapestry. The proposal seeks to be both figurative as the earliest tapestries were, and textural as the works of more recent fiber artists. Most of all it seeks to stand apart from the existing abstract and perceptual installations and provide a more direct reference through tapestry’s quality of incorporating the figurative and haptic together.

       Retallack Thompson  Nature   The hot-rolled steel panels veiling the entrance of the Faro Restaurant are continued in a fabric tapestry. Additional openings in the wall are suggested through the peeling and warping of the panels. From afar the effect is convincing, however up close the warmth of the tapestry’s materiality subverts expectations of a hard and unforgiving material.  The new openings rendered on the tapestry section of steel panels allude to a potential space beyond. It is one that can never be accessed, and is purposely left inarticulate so we continue to predict what could be beyond. The tapestry is an antithesis to the sublime scale of Boullée’s Cenotaph to Newton and the complexity of Tinguely’s Memorial to the Sacred Wind or the Tomb of a Kamikaze - it is a single opening(s). It is humane in scale, simple in form and full of the promise of the inconceived.

 

 

Retallack Thompson
Nature

The hot-rolled steel panels veiling the entrance of the Faro Restaurant are continued in a fabric tapestry. Additional openings in the wall are suggested through the peeling and warping of the panels. From afar the effect is convincing, however up close the warmth of the tapestry’s materiality subverts expectations of a hard and unforgiving material.

The new openings rendered on the tapestry section of steel panels allude to a potential space beyond. It is one that can never be accessed, and is purposely left inarticulate so we continue to predict what could be beyond. The tapestry is an antithesis to the sublime scale of Boullée’s Cenotaph to Newton and the complexity of Tinguely’s Memorial to the Sacred Wind or the Tomb of a Kamikaze - it is a single opening(s). It is humane in scale, simple in form and full of the promise of the inconceived.

 
       SAA. Studio Adrian Aguirre  Delirious Landscape   Nature has proven that determinism of morphologies is not rigorous, and that the same variation can produce diverse outcomes; morphology is not absolute, cities are in continuous evolution. Architecture as key instrument to represent evolution; aims to adapt and adjust to conditions of chaos, harmony, disruption, conjunction and human essence, abolishing a centralized city gestalt, resulting in a limitless variation of elements and spatial distortion.  Inspired by notable architectural visions of Etienne-Louis Boullée, Claude Nicolas Ledoux, Lebbeus Woods and Moon Hoon, delirious landscape illustrates a utopian existence of a rudimentary and decentralized architectural microcosms where a continuous circulatory system establishes order through a series of endless stairs connecting spaces, volumes and experiences.  The origins of delirious landscape are based on a vision of a utopian nomadic micronation, as a method and instrument to understand immediacy between architectural systems where the event of proximity creates a dynamic extension of architectural territories, an ephemeral expansion of space, without the extension of physical space. A reality leading to a post-human era of radical materialisation in architectural spaces.  Colours, events, dimensions react to focal points within the angle of the illustration, balancing accents acting as visual system correlated to the circulatory system.   

 

 

SAA. Studio Adrian Aguirre
Delirious Landscape

Nature has proven that determinism of morphologies is not rigorous, and that the same variation can produce diverse outcomes; morphology is not absolute, cities are in continuous evolution. Architecture as key instrument to represent evolution; aims to adapt and adjust to conditions of chaos, harmony, disruption, conjunction and human essence, abolishing a centralized city gestalt, resulting in a limitless variation of elements and spatial distortion.

Inspired by notable architectural visions of Etienne-Louis Boullée, Claude Nicolas Ledoux, Lebbeus Woods and Moon Hoon, delirious landscape illustrates a utopian existence of a rudimentary and decentralized architectural microcosms where a continuous circulatory system establishes order through a series of endless stairs connecting spaces, volumes and experiences.

The origins of delirious landscape are based on a vision of a utopian nomadic micronation, as a method and instrument to understand immediacy between architectural systems where the event of proximity creates a dynamic extension of architectural territories, an ephemeral expansion of space, without the extension of physical space. A reality leading to a post-human era of radical materialisation in architectural spaces.

Colours, events, dimensions react to focal points within the angle of the illustration, balancing accents acting as visual system correlated to the circulatory system.

 

 Sebastian Gatz  Delirious Landscape    A video of a video of a video of the architectural structure of Pharos is creating a series of more and more abstracted patterns - made from the space for the space.  Stills of the three videos showing architectural elements which increasingly get lost in the emerging colors of the digital/analog process - conceptually playing with the notion of time, space and dimensionality (of media).  The analog tapestry and the digital image following a similar logic of order - although operating in completely different time domains. While a tapestry is constructed over months and years the digital image is provided in milliseconds.  The here described iterative process reveals the (shared) orthogonal structure in the digital image while simultaneously blurring it.  Through the tactile process of tapestry, with its analog infinite material resolution, the blurred image gets sharpened on a specific level of craft - making it work on different (spatial) scales: sharp from distance, blurred from proximity, detailed in close vicinity.  The soft emerging colors and the logic of the phenomenological dimensionality starts a dialog with James Turrell’s works, which embeds the tapestry in a broader architectural / curatorial narrative.  At the same time it is a homage to the work of Nam June Paik (by referring to his media / video art works) and Jean Tinguely (and his destructive machinery).  The proposal suggests a replacement of the tapestry every year - the new based on a digital image of the old. An infinite process of digital/analog construction and destruction - playing with the irony of time in art.

Sebastian Gatz
Delirious Landscape

 A video of a video of a video of the architectural structure of Pharos is creating a series of more and more abstracted patterns - made from the space for the space.

Stills of the three videos showing architectural elements which increasingly get lost in the emerging colors of the digital/analog process - conceptually playing with the notion of time, space and dimensionality (of media).

The analog tapestry and the digital image following a similar logic of order - although operating in completely different time domains. While a tapestry is constructed over months and years the digital image is provided in milliseconds.

The here described iterative process reveals the (shared) orthogonal structure in the digital image while simultaneously blurring it.

Through the tactile process of tapestry, with its analog infinite material resolution, the blurred image gets sharpened on a specific level of craft - making it work on different (spatial) scales: sharp from distance, blurred from proximity, detailed in close vicinity.

The soft emerging colors and the logic of the phenomenological dimensionality starts a dialog with James Turrell’s works, which embeds the tapestry in a broader architectural / curatorial narrative.

At the same time it is a homage to the work of Nam June Paik (by referring to his media / video art works) and Jean Tinguely (and his destructive machinery).

The proposal suggests a replacement of the tapestry every year - the new based on a digital image of the old. An infinite process of digital/analog construction and destruction - playing with the irony of time in art.

 
 thingsmatter  Gravity Flower           My apple blossom,    you will grow up to fall down,    or you’ll be sliced apart.    Fight gravity while you can;    lead us into temptation.   Boullée and Tinguely saw different futures, and they celebrated different pasts. One designed an unbuildable monument for a celebrity physicist; the other jury-rigged a memorial for an anonymous suicide pilot. But the two artists, and the nominal subjects of their memorials, have this in common: unusually profound relationships with gravity.  The tapestry design is a fragile constellation formed from clean white coffers, within a field of colored frames. The apple tree branch and blossom is an optical artifact, unlike Newton’s apocryphal muse. But even its image seems pulled apart and downwards by invisible forces; it will soon dissolve into its woven backdrop, a blurry mirror of the river, ground, and sky outside Pharos.

thingsmatter
Gravity Flower

 

My apple blossom,

you will grow up to fall down,

or you’ll be sliced apart.

Fight gravity while you can;

lead us into temptation.

Boullée and Tinguely saw different futures, and they celebrated different pasts. One designed an unbuildable monument for a celebrity physicist; the other jury-rigged a memorial for an anonymous suicide pilot. But the two artists, and the nominal subjects of their memorials, have this in common: unusually profound relationships with gravity.

The tapestry design is a fragile constellation formed from clean white coffers, within a field of colored frames. The apple tree branch and blossom is an optical artifact, unlike Newton’s apocryphal muse. But even its image seems pulled apart and downwards by invisible forces; it will soon dissolve into its woven backdrop, a blurry mirror of the river, ground, and sky outside Pharos.

 Toby Beale, Stephen Brameld, Sally Farrah + Tasmin Vivian-Williams  Private Monument   Pier Vittorio Aureli wrote on the complex etymology of the term  monument : ‘from  monumentum  which means to remember, to commemorate. Yet this word is derivative of the verb  monere  (to admonish), the etymological root of the word  monster  – an exceptional form, and a species of one individual’. [1]  Where most international galleries exist in the centre, MONA sits on the periphery, growing out of its site at the edge of an embankment and river. MONA is an exceptional form of art institution and thus both monument and monster. However, the Pharos wing’s architecture inspired by Étienne-Louis Boullée’s monuments to death, and the art it contains – Jean Tinguely’s monument to memory, and James Turrell’s monument to light - all speak a geometric and monumental language. We felt Pharos needed a monster.  We explored architectural theoretical means to artistic ends. Marco Frascari has described anthropomorphism in architectural form as ‘monsters’. [2]  Architecture and tapestry are both crafts, but our design celebrates their differences. Unlike architecture which utilises physical depth, we perceived the unique characteristics of tapestry as its ability to  allude  to depth through the weaving of tones; and its ability to depict ‘plan’ and ‘elevation’ views simultaneously. These qualities of tapestry allow a monster, and not the monumental, to exhibit many  scales  of perception from several viewpoints.  Our design pays homage to the concept of monument by inferring a marble texture through wet satin. We began with a nude, subverting art history’s predominantly male gaze, by draping and photographing a man. Although the satin appears marmoreal, it behaves in a different material manner, creating monstrous softness, creases, and folds. We enhanced this texture by ripping and rescanning the image, which also mimics the surface nature of tapestry. This process reduced the body’s iconography to showcase the strengths of tapestry - tonality, ambiguity, and scales of perception.      [1]  Pier Vittorio Aureli, ‘The Monument and the Field’,  OASE  97 (2016), 34.   [2]  Marco Frascari,  Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architecture  (Savage, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1991).   

Toby Beale, Stephen Brameld, Sally Farrah + Tasmin Vivian-Williams
Private Monument

Pier Vittorio Aureli wrote on the complex etymology of the term monument: ‘from monumentum which means to remember, to commemorate. Yet this word is derivative of the verb monere (to admonish), the etymological root of the word monster – an exceptional form, and a species of one individual’.[1] Where most international galleries exist in the centre, MONA sits on the periphery, growing out of its site at the edge of an embankment and river. MONA is an exceptional form of art institution and thus both monument and monster. However, the Pharos wing’s architecture inspired by Étienne-Louis Boullée’s monuments to death, and the art it contains – Jean Tinguely’s monument to memory, and James Turrell’s monument to light - all speak a geometric and monumental language. We felt Pharos needed a monster.

We explored architectural theoretical means to artistic ends. Marco Frascari has described anthropomorphism in architectural form as ‘monsters’.[2] Architecture and tapestry are both crafts, but our design celebrates their differences. Unlike architecture which utilises physical depth, we perceived the unique characteristics of tapestry as its ability to allude to depth through the weaving of tones; and its ability to depict ‘plan’ and ‘elevation’ views simultaneously. These qualities of tapestry allow a monster, and not the monumental, to exhibit many scales of perception from several viewpoints.

Our design pays homage to the concept of monument by inferring a marble texture through wet satin. We began with a nude, subverting art history’s predominantly male gaze, by draping and photographing a man. Although the satin appears marmoreal, it behaves in a different material manner, creating monstrous softness, creases, and folds. We enhanced this texture by ripping and rescanning the image, which also mimics the surface nature of tapestry. This process reduced the body’s iconography to showcase the strengths of tapestry - tonality, ambiguity, and scales of perception.

 

[1] Pier Vittorio Aureli, ‘The Monument and the Field’, OASE 97 (2016), 34.

[2] Marco Frascari, Monsters of Architecture: Anthropomorphism in Architecture (Savage, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1991).